Browsing all articles tagged with IRS Archives - 2017 Tax Refund Schedule

The IRS reminds Taxpayers of the 2017 IRS Tax Refund Delay.

The IRS sent out a memo on Tuesday reminding the taxpayers of the upcoming 2017 IRS Tax Refund Delay.

As the holidays approach, the Internal Revenue Service today reminded taxpayers to remember that a new law requires the IRS to hold refunds until mid-February in 2017 for people claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit or the Additional Child Tax Credit. In addition, new identity theft and refund fraud safeguards put in place by the IRS and the states may mean some tax returns and refunds face additional review. The 2017 IRS Tax Refund Delay will affect millions of taxpayers filing a 2016 tax return. Read more »

When is the first day to file taxes 2017?

The IRS have yet to release an official first day to file taxes 2017, but we estimate January 24th, 2017 to be the first day to file in 2017.

Per the 2017 Refund Schedule, the IRS will begin accepting 2016 Tax Returns on January 23rd, 2017. In previous years, we have seen the IRS announce their official start date for the upcoming tax season in December. As soon as we have the official date, we will update this post. Please bookmark and share to get the word out. This is the answer to “When is the first day to file taxes 2017?”. Read more »

The 2016 tax brackets just announced by the Internal Revenue Service don’t include dramatic changes, largely because of low inflation last year.

The brackets will rise about 0.5 percent, the IRS said, meaning a $50 increase for single filers in the lowest tax bracket up to a $2,100 increase for married filers in the highest tax bracket. Read more »

IRS Announces Tax Return Filing Season Opens January 11, 2016. When can we file taxes for 2016?

Are you ready to file your 2015 Tax Return? It’s not quite time for that yet, but the time is coming. If you are awaiting a 2016 tax refund, you cannot get it until you file your 2015 tax return, and the IRS say it will start accepting tax returns starting January 11, 2016. The IRS do not expect any hold ups this year with all of the tax extenders being passed last year. 2016 Tax Season will open as planned in 2016. When can we file taxes for 2016?

The IRS will begin accepting 2015 tax returns electronically on Jan. 11. Paper tax returns will begin processing at the same time. This means that unlike prior years, the IRS will be accepting 2015 tax returns much earlier. This should also speed up tax refunds in your bank account.

Last year 2014 Tax Returns began being accepted January 20th 2015. This is giving us a 9 day leap from prior year. This is information from last year, “We have reviewed the late tax law changes and determined there was nothing preventing us from continuing our updating and testing of our systems,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. “Our employees will continue an aggressive schedule of testing and preparation of our systems during the next month to complete the final stages needed for the 2015 tax season.”

The IRS reminds taxpayers that filing electronically is the most accurate way to file a tax return and the fastest way to get a refund. According to the IRS statement, there is no advantage to filing tax returns on paper in early January instead of waiting for e-file to begin. The IRS says more information about IRS Free File and other information about the 2016 filing season will be available in January.

Check out 2016 IRS Tax Schedule for Tax Year 2015, here.

IRS Smartphone App IRS2Go Updated.

If you already have the app, go to our apps and update it. Get the “Where’s my refund?” app on Android & Apple IPhone/IPad/IPod App.

Updated IRS Smartphone App IRS2Go Version 5.0 Now Available

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today announced the release of IRS2Go 5.0, an update to the only official IRS smartphone application, compatible with both Apple and Android devices. Read more »

We updated our IRS E-File Cycle Chart today to account for the IRS changing the payout dates from Thursday to Wednesday. Check out the changes and please let us know if you find any problems.

2015 IRS Tax Refund Schedule.

Having trouble with the IRS Where’s My Refund tool? Here are some handy tools to decipher your way around this.

How to read your IRS tax account transcript.

Tax Topic 151

Tax Topic 152 Read more »

IRS says 2015 Tax Season could be delayed for 2014 tax filings.

Americans might have to wait longer than usual to receive their tax refunds in 2015.

The IRS is waiting for lawmakers to act on expired tax provisions called extenders. If Congress fails to resolve the issue by the end of November, that could delay the 2015 tax season — and therefore push back the date when refund checks start to get cut and sent out.

IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said the agency is currently upgrading its systems, which will help streamline the tax filing process.

“Continued uncertainty would impose even more stress not only on the IRS, but also on the entire tax community, including tax professionals, software providers, and tax volunteers, who are all critical to the successful operation of our nation’s tax system,” Koskinen wrote in a letter to Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden (D-Ore.).

“If Congress waits until 2015 and then enacts retroactive tax law changes affecting 2014, the operational and compliance challenges would be even more severe — likely resulting in service disruptions, millions of taxpayers needing to file amended returns, and substantially delayed refunds.”

Wyden responded with a statement posted to the committee’s website, urging lawmakers to take action and not risk delays in next year’s tax season.

“It has been over six months since the Finance Committee passed the EXPIRE Act with strong bipartisan support,” Wyden said in the statement. “As the 2015 tax season begins to loom large, it is more urgent than ever that Congress moves in a decisive and bipartisan way to renew expired tax provisions that will give taxpayers the certainty they need to plan their finances.

“According to the IRS, the longer Congress delays action the greater risk that the tax filing season and millions of taxpayer refunds will be delayed, among other serious disruptions. As the economy begins to show signs of strength, uncertainty from the federal tax code is the last thing American businesses and families need as they look to grow and invest. Congress needs to act swiftly on these important tax provisions so it can get to work on a comprehensive overhaul of the tax code and lift the fog of uncertainty from taxpayers.”

If Congress does not act, more than 50 tax breaks worth almost $85 billion will not be available in 2015. Congress is slated to return to Washington Nov. 14, after the midterm elections.

This is why 2015 Tax Refunds Could Be Delayed. We will update the 2015 IRS Refund Cycle Chart as soon as we are given the official word that refunds will be processed later in 2015. Like us on Facebook and bookmark are site to get the latest tax schedule news.

2015  Tax Season Delayed

2015 Tax Wait

2015 Tax Refunds Delayed

Tax Season 2015 starts January 23rd 2015.

The I.R.S is expected to start accepting 2015 tax returns as of January 23rd, 2015 per the 2015 IRS Refund Cycle Chart. This doesn’t mean that you will not be able to submit your 2014 tax return to the I.R.S before then though. All of the I.R.S. tax forms are usually available by January 5th (2015). If filing by January 23rd, 2015, check our 2015 IRS Refund Cycle Chart to see when you will get your return back. Also if you will owe taxes in 2015, this can give you an idea of the earliest date that you would need to pay them. Tax Season 2015 will begin very soon, so the time to start preparing is now.

Tax Season 2015DISCLAIMER: This is merely an estimate based on prior year(2014). We do not guarantee this date and the I.R.S. does not release official dates to the public.

Tax Season 2015

Tax Season 2015 starts

Tax Season 2015 begins

when is tax season 2015

first day to file taxes 2015

Tax Season 2015 starts

Why is my 2014 tax return still processing?

2015 IRS Tax Refund Schedule wrong for you?

By the stats, the current tax season has been quite a success. The Internal Revenue Service is reporting that, despite an abbreviated season, they are processing tax returns and issuing tax refunds at a much faster pace than last year. Why is my 2014 refund still processing?

Of course, all of the numbers in the world don’t matter when the one number you’re counting on – your own refund – is affected.

This season, I’ve heard from a number of taxpayers experiencing tax refund delays (though certainly nothing near last year’s education credit snafu). Initially, the trouble seemed to focus on those 1121 codes. The IRS was made aware of the problem and did issue a statement, saying:

A very small percentage of taxpayers may see an 1121 reference number if they check “Where’s My Refund?” after they initially were provided a projected refund date by the tool. The IRS is aware of this situation, and emphasizes that the small group of taxpayers who see this reference number should continue checking Where’s My Refund for an update. If we need more information to process their return, we will contact them — usually by mail.

Most of the taxpayers who reached out to me regarding the 1121 issue have since reported that they’ve either received their refunds or updated information about the delay.

However, shortly after the 1121 issue was made public, the focus from taxpayers on social media – and in emails, direct messages and private messages to me – has zeroed in on another code that’s popping up over and over: TC 570. There is a notable difference between the 1121 code and the TC 570: the latter is not an explicit refund code. It appears not on the “Where’s My Refund?” tool but on a taxpayer’s transcript. That’s an important distinction.

I reached out to IRS to find out whether there was any sort of systemic issue causing taxpayers to see a TC 570 on their transcript. So far, the answer to that question is no. The IRS is, however, clearly aware of the concerns and had this to say:

A Transaction Code 570 can mean different things in different cases so a taxpayer should not try to draw a conclusion based on the presence of a TC 570. The Transaction Code 570 will stop a refund from being issued until the impact of the action being taken on the account and the refund is determined and processed. Transaction Codes are used internally by the IRS to identify a transaction, adjust and research tax accounts and to maintain a history of actions posted to a taxpayer’s account. While they are reflected on transcripts they are not reflected on most public facing documents or tools like Where’s My Refund because they are difficult to interpret and can have different meaning depending on the case and associated codes and files. Again, the best way for taxpayers to check the status of their refund is by going to Where’s My Refund.

It’s a statement worth repeating. The IRS uses a lot of internal codes on transcripts and they can mean different things. And what it means exactly isn’t always apparent to the person taking the call at IRS. Does that suck? Of course it does. Trust me. I’ve been on the end of those calls trying to decipher what’s going on for taxpayers. And I totally believe that taxpayers are calling IRS and getting two or three different answers about the status of their refund. And I believe that taxpayers deserve a better answer.

But I would caution taxpayers not to try and pick apart their tax transcripts in an effort to find answers. There is no “one size fits all” answer to the TC 570 – not even in the best of circumstances. It does not necessarily equate, as some have surmised, an audit. Nor does it means, as others have posited, that the refund is subject to an offset. It could mean those things – but again, you’re not going to be able to tell from a glimpse at your transcript this early in the season.

Those codes? They don’t always mean what you think they mean.

I know that isn’t the answer that taxpayers want to hear. And trust me, I am continuing to pester IRS about these issues (believe me when I say that they have my number). But it’s not a certainty that a TC 570 on your transcript is anything sinister at this stage of the season. The data doesn’t appear to support it. And if there’s a real problem with your specific return, you’ll hear from IRS.

And yes, there have been problems. I have confirmed reports that a glitch in at least one program has resulted in the issuance of paper checks instead of direct deposit. Errors – mostly transposition of numbers – have slowed processing of other returns. There have been bounces for bad addresses. Returns have been held because of prior years when no returns were filed. And yes, identity theft continues to be a big problem especially when SocialSecurity numbers for dependents have appeared on more than one return. Clearly, not everyone is having a smooth tax season.

By the numbers, however, most taxpayers are getting their refunds as quickly as anticipated. On average, the IRS expects to issue tax refund checks to 9 of 10 taxpayers in 21 days or less. Those are pretty good odds. But that still means that 1 in 10 taxpayers will receive refund checks after that 21 day window. That sounds like a pretty small number until you calculate the total against the number of refunds issued. The IRS expects to process about 140 million tax returns this season. In 2013, they issued more than 100 million tax refund checks. If 1 in 10 taxpayers get their refunds after 21 days, that still works out to about 10 million taxpayers. That’s more than the individual populations of 42 states. It’s more than the combination populations of Alabama and South Carolina, the 23rd and 24th most populous states. So, yes, it’s a lot. But the number of taxpayers who do receive their refunds within that 21 day window? That’s more than the combined populations of our most populous states (California, Texas and Florida) or more astoundingly, the combined population of 25 of our least populous states.

Does that help those taxpayers who are depending on refund checks that have not yet been deposited? Of course not. I know you want your money. And I know that in many cases, you’re depending on that money. But work through the right channels. Keep checking the “Where’s My Refund?” tool for information. If you are advised to call the IRS, do so. If you get mail from IRS, open it. But at this stage, it truly is a waiting game. If I hear anything further (and I am pursuing these issues), rest assured that I will post it as soon as it becomes available.

Discuss this and more on the Income Tax Forums.

Need help preparing your 2015 Tax Return? Visit Hot Springs Tax Services.

IRS Warns of Tax Scams in 2014.

The IRS is warning Americans of tax scams. This year identity theft and phone scams top the agency’s “Dirty Dozen” list of worst schemes taxpayers could encounter.

In a news release, the IRS announced Americans could see these scams at any point in the year, but many of the schemes peak during tax season.

“Scams can be sophisticated and take many different forms. We urge people to protect themselves and use caution when viewing emails, receiving phone calls or getting advice on tax issues,” IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said in a news release.

Below are the top three scams taxpayers should be on the lookout this year. IRS Warns of Tax Scams!

Identity Theft

The IRS said tax fraud through identity theft tops this year’s list. Fraudsters like to get taxpayers Social Security Number and other bits of information. They then use it to fraudulently file a tax return and claim the refund.

The IRS suggests taxpayers be alert to possible identity theft if they receive an IRS notice that states:

  • More than one tax return for you was filed.
  • You have a balance due, refund offset or have had collection actions taken against you for a year you did not file a tax return.
  • IRS records indicated you received wages from an employer unknown to you.

If you believe you were a victim of identity theft the IRS suggests you notify the agency as soon as possible.

Telephone Scams

The IRS said it has seen an increase in local phone scams across the United States. Callers pretned to be from the IRS. The goal is to steal money or identities from victims.

According to the IRS, these scams come in many variations. Some callers will say the victim owes money or is entitled to a larg refund. Others might threaten arrest or driver’s license revocation.

Common characteristics of these scams include:

  • Scammers use fake names and IRS badge numbers.
  • Callers might be able to recite the last four digits of a victims Social Security Number.
  • Con artists may imitate the IRS toll-free number to make it seems like it’s the IRS calling.
  • Scammers sometimes send falsified IRS emails to victims to support their bogus calls.

False Promises of “Free Money”

It is common for scam artists to pose as tax preparers during tax season. The IRS said scammers lure victims in by promising large federal tax refunds. They use flyers, phony store fronts and word of mouth to attract as many victims as possible. The IRS said these scammers prey on people who do have a filing requirement like low-income individuals and the elderly.

For more information on these scams and several others visit IRS.gov.

Find out when your Income Tax Return will arrive on our 2014 IRS E-File Cycle Chart.

Discuss this on the Income Tax Forums.