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The IRS reminds Taxpayers of the 2017 IRS Tax Refund Delay.

The IRS sent out a memo on Tuesday reminding the taxpayers of the upcoming 2017 IRS Tax Refund Delay.

As the holidays approach, the Internal Revenue Service today reminded taxpayers to remember that a new law requires the IRS to hold refunds until mid-February in 2017 for people claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit or the Additional Child Tax Credit. In addition, new identity theft and refund fraud safeguards put in place by the IRS and the states may mean some tax returns and refunds face additional review. The 2017 IRS Tax Refund Delay will affect millions of taxpayers filing a 2016 tax return. Read more »

When is the first day to file taxes 2017?

The IRS have yet to release an official first day to file taxes 2017, but we estimate January 24th, 2017 to be the first day to file in 2017.

Per the 2017 Refund Schedule, the IRS will begin accepting 2016 Tax Returns on January 23rd, 2017. In previous years, we have seen the IRS announce their official start date for the upcoming tax season in December. As soon as we have the official date, we will update this post. Please bookmark and share to get the word out. This is the answer to “When is the first day to file taxes 2017?”. Read more »

The 2016 tax brackets just announced by the Internal Revenue Service don’t include dramatic changes, largely because of low inflation last year.

The brackets will rise about 0.5 percent, the IRS said, meaning a $50 increase for single filers in the lowest tax bracket up to a $2,100 increase for married filers in the highest tax bracket. Read more »

IRS Announces Tax Return Filing Season Opens January 11, 2016. When can we file taxes for 2016?

Are you ready to file your 2015 Tax Return? It’s not quite time for that yet, but the time is coming. If you are awaiting a 2016 tax refund, you cannot get it until you file your 2015 tax return, and the IRS say it will start accepting tax returns starting January 11, 2016. The IRS do not expect any hold ups this year with all of the tax extenders being passed last year. 2016 Tax Season will open as planned in 2016. When can we file taxes for 2016?

The IRS will begin accepting 2015 tax returns electronically on Jan. 11. Paper tax returns will begin processing at the same time. This means that unlike prior years, the IRS will be accepting 2015 tax returns much earlier. This should also speed up tax refunds in your bank account.

Last year 2014 Tax Returns began being accepted January 20th 2015. This is giving us a 9 day leap from prior year. This is information from last year, “We have reviewed the late tax law changes and determined there was nothing preventing us from continuing our updating and testing of our systems,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. “Our employees will continue an aggressive schedule of testing and preparation of our systems during the next month to complete the final stages needed for the 2015 tax season.”

The IRS reminds taxpayers that filing electronically is the most accurate way to file a tax return and the fastest way to get a refund. According to the IRS statement, there is no advantage to filing tax returns on paper in early January instead of waiting for e-file to begin. The IRS says more information about IRS Free File and other information about the 2016 filing season will be available in January.

Check out 2016 IRS Tax Schedule for Tax Year 2015, here.

We updated our IRS E-File Cycle Chart today to account for the IRS changing the payout dates from Thursday to Wednesday. Check out the changes and please let us know if you find any problems.

2015 IRS Tax Refund Schedule.

Having trouble with the IRS Where’s My Refund tool? Here are some handy tools to decipher your way around this.

How to read your IRS tax account transcript.

Tax Topic 151

Tax Topic 152 Read more »

IRS Tax Schedule Changes. IRS Start up Tax Season early for testing of acceptance system

The IRS have started accepting a limited amount of tax returns for testing purposes of the IRS system.
Great news! The IRS have begin testing for the upcoming Tax Season 2015.

We have reports from our affiliate RefundSchedule.com that the IRS have accepted several lucky tax payers to have their IRS tax returns accepted early. This does not include state tax returns as far as we know. They accepted January 14th through January 16th for these lucky few. More details:

Early reports of IRS approving many tax returns ahead of time.

 

Want to get your 2014 tax return back quick? E-File now.

 2014 Tax Return Back QuickThe IRS recommends filing as early as possible and e filing to speed up the process. This way no matter the delay, you will first in line to have your tax return processed and receive your 2015 tax refund promptly. IRS have released most tax forms to handle most situations, but even if they haven’t released your form you can still e file with most tax softwares. If you plan to e file with a local company then you will need to wait until the official start of 2015 IRS Tax Season, January 20th 2015.  2014 Tax Return Back Quick Today! Read more »

When can you file taxes 2015?

If you like to file your taxes early and then chuckle at all the procrastinators who wait until April 15 nears, your day of reckoning is getting close. The earliest day the IRS will begin proTax Season 2015cessing 2014 individual tax returns is Jan. 20, 2015, a date slightly later than usual due to congress not passing tax related laws earlier in 2014.
This date can be found on our 2015 Tax Schedule.
A reminder this delay  will not be until October 2015 as previously reported on a fake journalism website.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) began accepting and processing federal tax returns for tax year 2014 on January 20, 2015. You had until April 15, 2015, to file your tax return unless you filed for an extension.

You can file your tax return with the Internal Revenue Service by:

The IRS offers free tax help, and if you owe the IRS money, payment options are available.

You can receive your tax refund in one of three ways.

For more information about filing your taxes, visit 1040 Central.

Changes for 2015 Tax Season
New for the 2015 filing season, some IRS assistance and taxpayer services shift to automated resources. Many of these automated services are available 24/7.

Contact the IRS
For more information or help, contact the IRS by phone or mail at:

Individuals: 1-800-829-1040
Businesses: 1-800-829-4933
TTY: 1-800-829-4059
International IRS Offices (if you live outside the U.S.)

When can I file my taxes in 2015?

When can you file taxes 2015?

Estimate your Tax Refund with your Tax Return Estimator

Income tax filing can be a dreaded event for some taxpayers, but if you are expecting a tax refund, it’s a good idea to know how much you could be getting back. Estimate your Tax Refund today!

The “Tax Refund Estimatortax calculator can simplify the process for you and help provide a fairly reliable figure on your estimated tax refund.

This tax calculator can also help you determine whether you’ve underpaid taxes for the year, and if so, how much you will owe the IRS on April 15th.

If you’re getting a tax refund, this online calculator can help you plan how to use those funds most appropriately ― whether you want to pay-off some bills or start an investment account for yourself or your children. Use the “Tax Refund Estimator” to quickly and easily estimate how much you’ll be getting back as a tax refund, or whether you’ll need to pay Uncle Sam.  You will need to enter certain information into the tax calculator, including the items below.

>> FILE NOW: eFile your taxes for FREE

Tax Filing Status

Choose your filing status from the tax calculator’s drop-down menu, which includes the same options as the IRS Form 1040 (single, head of household, married filing separately, or married filing jointly).

Gross Annual Income

Enter the amount of your gross annual income into the tax calculator. This refers to your total annual earnings ― including tips, bonuses, self-employment income, and any other wages before taxes are withheld.

Qualified Plan / IRA Contribution

If you are not participating in a plan sponsored by your employer (such as a SEP IRA, SIMPLE IRA, or other qualified plan), the contributions that you make to your Traditional IRA are generally tax-deductible. If you do participate in an employer-sponsored plan, the deductibility of your contributions is based on your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) and your tax filing status.  Input your total contribution into this field on the tax calculator.

Itemized Deductions

If you have numerous deductible expenses (such as mortgage interest, state or local taxes, medical or dental expenses, alimony, child care, or charitable contributions), it may make sense for you to itemize those deductions.  If your total itemized tax deductions are greater than the standard deduction for your filing status, enter that dollar amount in this field on the tax calculator.

Number of Personal Exemptions

You can claim a personal exemption for yourself and for each dependent that you support. Exemptions are subtracted from your income when calculating taxes, so you pay less to the IRS. Note that the personal exemption amount may adjust annually for inflation.  Enter the total amount of your exemptions into this field on the tax calculator.

Number of Dependents

In this part of the tax refund calculator, you must report any dependents who rely of you for support ― this may include your child or another family member you take care of. To qualify as a dependent for tax purposes, there are certain IRS requirements that must be met.

Federal Taxes Withheld

Enter the total dollar amount of Federal income taxes that were withheld from your paycheck. Note that under-withholding can result in owing additional money to the IRS. Once you have put all the appropriate information into the Tax Refund Estimator tax calculator, click “Submit” to view your results.

Estimate your Tax Refund Online.

IRS says 2015 Tax Season could be delayed for 2014 tax filings.

Americans might have to wait longer than usual to receive their tax refunds in 2015.

The IRS is waiting for lawmakers to act on expired tax provisions called extenders. If Congress fails to resolve the issue by the end of November, that could delay the 2015 tax season — and therefore push back the date when refund checks start to get cut and sent out.

IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said the agency is currently upgrading its systems, which will help streamline the tax filing process.

“Continued uncertainty would impose even more stress not only on the IRS, but also on the entire tax community, including tax professionals, software providers, and tax volunteers, who are all critical to the successful operation of our nation’s tax system,” Koskinen wrote in a letter to Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden (D-Ore.).

“If Congress waits until 2015 and then enacts retroactive tax law changes affecting 2014, the operational and compliance challenges would be even more severe — likely resulting in service disruptions, millions of taxpayers needing to file amended returns, and substantially delayed refunds.”

Wyden responded with a statement posted to the committee’s website, urging lawmakers to take action and not risk delays in next year’s tax season.

“It has been over six months since the Finance Committee passed the EXPIRE Act with strong bipartisan support,” Wyden said in the statement. “As the 2015 tax season begins to loom large, it is more urgent than ever that Congress moves in a decisive and bipartisan way to renew expired tax provisions that will give taxpayers the certainty they need to plan their finances.

“According to the IRS, the longer Congress delays action the greater risk that the tax filing season and millions of taxpayer refunds will be delayed, among other serious disruptions. As the economy begins to show signs of strength, uncertainty from the federal tax code is the last thing American businesses and families need as they look to grow and invest. Congress needs to act swiftly on these important tax provisions so it can get to work on a comprehensive overhaul of the tax code and lift the fog of uncertainty from taxpayers.”

If Congress does not act, more than 50 tax breaks worth almost $85 billion will not be available in 2015. Congress is slated to return to Washington Nov. 14, after the midterm elections.

This is why 2015 Tax Refunds Could Be Delayed. We will update the 2015 IRS Refund Cycle Chart as soon as we are given the official word that refunds will be processed later in 2015. Like us on Facebook and bookmark are site to get the latest tax schedule news.

2015  Tax Season Delayed

2015 Tax Wait

2015 Tax Refunds Delayed